<strong>/<b>-HTML-Tags too bold/big (see pic)

UNCONFIRMED
Unassigned

Status

()

Firefox
General
--
major
UNCONFIRMED
7 years ago
7 years ago

People

(Reporter: Patrick, Unassigned)

Tracking

Trunk
x86
Windows 7
Points:
---

Firefox Tracking Flags

(Not tracked)

Details

(URL)

(Reporter)

Description

7 years ago
User-Agent:       Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:2.0b12) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/4.0b12
Build Identifier: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:2.0b12) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/4.0b12

On some (many) pages is the font-size too big

Reproducible: Always
What site is this? Sounds like bug 635640.
Version: unspecified → Trunk
(Reporter)

Comment 2

7 years ago
http://www.n24.de/ (mainpage) and http://stuttgarter-nachrichten.de (subpage), eg. http://www.stuttgarter-nachrichten.de/inhalt.schwarzer-donnerstag-revierleiter-verliert-seine-stelle.96b85498-f8be-4a01-be28-cfeae9c4bd39.html ,..

But almost all the pages look'S too fat and "blurry" compared with Firefox 3 or Chrome (Or my eyes are broken between Firefox 3 and Firefox 4...)
(In reply to comment #2)
> http://www.n24.de/ (mainpage) 

I looked at this example; the list of videos is styled with "font-weight: bold" in the CSS, and the titles are then *also* placed in a <strong> element, which is (by default) styled with "font-weight: bolder". As DirectWrite supports more than just two weights (regular/bold) in a family, this bolder-than-bold styling results in using the Arial Black face. This is correct behavior for the page as written; the authors did not properly design for an environment with more extensive font families.

Bug 635640 addresses the issue that when the Arial Black face gets used, it alters the vertical (line-spacing) metrics of the text; however, comment #17 there sounds like this isn't going to be changed. Our behavior is correct in that it honors the metrics in the font; the issue is that this face is inconsistent with the rest of the Arial family.

> But almost all the pages look'S too fat and "blurry" compared with Firefox 3 or
> Chrome (Or my eyes are broken between Firefox 3 and Firefox 4...)

That sounds like the difference between DirectWrite/D2D antialiasing and "classic" GDI antialiasing. Different rendering technology gives different results. (Sometimes better, sometimes worse, and often it's a matter of opinion.)
You need to log in before you can comment on or make changes to this bug.